Home arrow Nutrition, Food Security and Safety arrow Cajanus Vol 39 No. 2, 2006

Cajanus Vol 39 No. 2, 2006

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In the previous issue of Cajanus, some commonly used Caribbean staple foods, fruits and vegetables, legumes and nuts were presented. The remaining two of the six food groups, namely foods from animals, and fats and oils are the focus of this issue that highlights many attractive and healthy choices.

Foods from animals have

always been featured prominently

whether in community markets,

supermarkets or dining tables.

Although they are noted for

absorbing a large proportion of the

food budget, they are still a “must

have” for many persons while

others consider them as optional.

Foods from animals offer a range

of nutrients but the presence of

saturated fat can also contribute to

the development of many diseases,

especially cardiovascular disease.

Greater care should therefore be

exercised regarding selection and

even preparation of foods from

animals.

Plant-based foods, such as

avocado, coconut and ackee, with

a notable high fat content have

also been conversational as well as

debatable topics especially among

persons who are or should be

concerned about dietary fat intake.

It is heartening to note that it is

well established that the quality of

fat in these items is different to

that which is present in foods from

animals and thus can be viewed as

“heart healthy”. However, moderation

should still be the overriding

guideline.

In the Caribbean, many appetites

are not satisfied without the

inclusion of a sweet-tasting item

some of which may include

sugar or honey. Both of these

items are entangled in the

culinary fare, our national

psyches as well as our agriculture.

Although sugar has lost its

position on the world market to

the extent that much of the

industry no longer exists in

many countries, it still remains a

widely used item and contributes

a significant amount of

calories to the daily diet of many

persons although honey is fast

becoming an acceptable substitute.

However, it should always

be remembered that honey is not

recommended to be used

substitute. However, it

should always be remembered

that honey is not

recommended to be used

for infants.

As with the previous

issue of Cajanus, each

article here presents a brief

historical perspective and

then elaborates the health

contribution and some

dietary uses. Both volumes

comprise a wealth of nutrition

information and show the health

riches of our Caribbean foods.

60

editorials

Vol 39

 
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