Home

Monitoring Emergencies

From official sources (F.O.) and media (M.C.). It does not represent PAHO's official position.

Chile 4/15/2014

Valparaíso region. Wildfires update. (12-15 April) 15 dead, 11,000 affected and 12,400 people evacuated. Of the evacuees, 1,018 are in nine shelters. 2,300 homes are damaged. There is an increase in respiratory illness cases due to the smoke. The majority of victims remain in the affected areas. The fire continues to have some active focal points. Response: Health authorities are reorganizing and increasing health services capacity. Seven mental health teams are working in shelters and vaccination being implemented for those sheltered as well as volunteers. Trucks are distributing water and water tanks are being installed in shelters. There is a health alert for the Valparaíso region. The Government has sent humanitarian aid and emergency temporary homes to Valparaíso. (o.s: Ministry of Health, ONEMI, CONAF, ESVAL, PAHO Office in Chile)

Arica y Parinacota and Tarapaca regions. 8.2M earthquake update (1-15 April). A 5.3 magnitude aftershock occurred with no reports of further damages. Total: 21,813 people affected, 912 people in nine shelters, and 15,300 damaged homes. Iquique Hospital is 80% operational and a mobile unit is supporting a health center in Alto Hospicio, but the rest of the health network is fully operational. (o.s: ONEMI, Chile Seismology, PAHO Office in Chile)

Nicaragua 4/15/2014

Earthquake update (10-14 April). Total: 2 dead, 266 injured, and 6,628 people affected in Nagarote. 1,585 people were evacuated; of them, 710 people are in shelters in Managua (647) and Nagarote (67). There are minor damages, such as cracks, in 22 health facilities, and 2,375 homes are affected. Shallow seismic activity continues near Motobombo volcano. Response: Medical brigades mobilized, health services reorganized, and field hospitals deployed as a preventive measure in Managua. The majority of medical consults have been mental health related. UN Agencies offered technical assistance and international organizations are on alert. Cuba and Venezuela sent humanitarian aid as well as seismologists to provide technical support. An extreme red alert has been declared on the national level. (o.s: UNETE, Government of Nicaragua, INETER, PAHO Office in Nicaragua; m: El 19 Digital)

Bolivia 4/15/2014

Floods update (January-14 April): In Guayamerín, the water level is decreasing, but the state of emergency continues due to the possibility of the Mamoré river rising. Seven rivers accros the country are on red alert. Beni department continues to receive support. (o.s: Hydrographic Naval Service; m: Prensa Latina, FM Noticias)

Colombia 4/15/2014

Cauca department. Update on displacement in Guapí (14 March-12 April). Clashes cause an additional 137 people to be displaced. 428 people return to Joanico, but 378 still remain in shelters. (f.o: OCHA Colombia)

Chile 4/15/2014

Valparaíso region. Wildfires update. (12-15 April) 15 dead, 11,000 affected and 12,400 people evacuated. Of the evacuees, 1,018 are in nine shelters. 2,300 homes are damaged. There is an increase in respiratory illness cases due to the smoke. The majority of victims remain in the affected areas. The fire continues to have some active focal points. Response: Health authorities are reorganizing and increasing health services capacity. Seven mental health teams are working in shelters and vaccination being implemented for those sheltered as well as volunteers. Trucks are distributing water and water tanks are being installed in shelters. There is a health alert for the Valparaíso region. The Government has sent humanitarian aid and emergency temporary homes to Valparaíso. (o.s: Ministry of Health, ONEMI, CONAF, ESVAL, PAHO Office in Chile)

Arica y Parinacota and Tarapaca regions. 8.2M earthquake update (1-15 April). A 5.3 magnitude aftershock occurred with no reports of further damages. Total: 21,813 people affected, 912 people in nine shelters, and 15,300 damaged homes. Iquique Hospital is 80% operational and a mobile unit is supporting a health center in Alto Hospicio, but the rest of the health network is fully operational. (o.s: ONEMI, Chile Seismology, PAHO Office in Chile)

Essential Medicines List for Emergencies and Disasters in the Caribbean

Print

Every year, countries are faced by threats of hurricanes, floods, landslides, earthquakes and volcanoes. Several diseases have been observed in the aftermath of such disaster situations. For example, floods can potentially increase the transmission of water-borne diseases; vector-borne diseases can also be observed. Other illnesses of main concern after disaster events are skin problems and trauma, and of less occurrence are rabies, Clostridium dificile, tetanus, snake bite, meningitis, acute respiratory infections, and acute malnutrition. Mental health problems may also increase following a disaster. However, as the disaster impact worsens; the risk of communicable diseases, especially among women and children, is a health threat to the community.

Soon after an emergency, it is important to focus in providing continuous health services in health facilities, disease surveillance, and providing the needed essential medicines. During emergencies and disasters, a standard medicines list permits an effective response with medicines and medical devices using standard, pre-packed kits that could be kept in readiness to meet priority health needs. The provision of the medicines from this publication will help in reducing any excess in morbidity and mortality due to communicable and non communicable diseases in populations affected by disasters and emergencies.

This technical document is the result of the inter-programmatic work of PAHO/WHO’s Area of Health Systems Based on Primary Health Care/Medicines and Health Technologies and the Area on Emergency Preparedness and Disaster Relief. Essential medicines have been selected with due regard to disease prevalence, evidence on efficacy and safety, and comparative cost-effectiveness. The 16th Edition of the Model List of Essential Medicines (2010) and the Interagency Emergency Health Kit (2006) were used as references.

The list is proposed as a first approach to be used as contribution for the national disaster preparedness plans which need to be updated regularly.

This publication is only available in  PDF format. You will need Adobe Acrobat Reader to read the file. Download the software for free from the Adobe website.

Download the publication

 

Facebook Disasters Twitter Disasters You Tube Disasters

Knowledge Center on Public Health and Disasters 

 


 

Regional Office of the World Health Organization
525 Twenty-third Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20037, United States of America
Tel: +1 (202) 974-3000  y   +1 (202) 974-3000 Fax: +1 (202) 974-3663

© Pan American Health Organization. All rights reserved.