Social Media

Flickr
Vimeo
Picasa
Home
Media Advisory, An End to Cervical Cancer—the Time is Now Print E-mail
The Alliance for Cervical Cancer Prevention, of which the Pan American Health Organization is a member, invites media representatives and the general public to an expert panel discussion on cervical cancer, as part of a series of events in observance of International Women’s Day. The panel will happen on Wednesday, March 5, 8:30 to 11 a.m.(5/Mar/2008)

Cervical cancer is the number-one cancer killer of women worldwide, taking 270,000 lives each year. More than 37,000 of those deaths occur in Latin America and the Caribbean.

WHAT: The Alliance for Cervical Cancer Prevention, of which the Pan American Health Organization is a member, invites media representatives and the general public to an expert panel discussion on cervical cancer, as part of a series of events in observance of International Women’s Day. The panel will explore the use of novel approaches to cancer screening in combination with new human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccines to drastically reduce cervical cancer deaths worldwide.

WHEN: Wednesday, March 5, 8:30 to 11 a.m. (breakfast will be served)

WHERE: Goethe Institute, 812 Seventh St., N.W. (between 7th and I streets), in Washington, D.C. (Less than a block from the Chinatown Gate – Gallery Place/Chinatown Metro stop, red, yellow or green lines)

WHO: Confirmed speakers include:

  • Ms. Silvana Luciani, of the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO)
  • Dr. Harshad Sanghvi, of JHPIEGO, an international health affiliate of The Johns Hopkins University
  • Dr. R. Sankaranarayan, International Agency for Research on Cancer
  • Dr. Jacqueline Sherris, of PATH, an international, nonprofit global health organization.

WHY: Women in developing countries bear the brunt of the burden of cervical cancer, with 85 percent of deaths due to this disease occurring in poor countries that lack adequate cancer screening and treatment programs. This contrasts starkly with the United States, Europe, and Australia, where cervical cancer rates have dropped dramatically over the past 40 years.

The world now has an extraordinary opportunity to reduce the burden of cervical cancer with simple screening methods that detect the early stages of disease, when treatment is most effective, and with innovative new technologies, including low-cost DNA screening and vaccines that protect young women early in life.

"Fortunately, every day more instruments for lowering the incidence of cervical cancer are becoming available. However, we must raise awareness and build the necessary consensus to effectively utilize these instruments, coordinating the efforts of governments, public health facilities, the private sector, families, and the population at large. We know that cervical cancer is significantly exacerbated by social and economic inequalities, adversely impacting indigenous, poor and rural women."


PAHO Director, Dr. Mirta Roses

PAHO, founded in 1902, works with all the countries of the Americas to improve the health and quality of life of their peoples. It also serves as the Regional Office for the Americas of the World Health Organization.

Last Updated on Sunday, 30 March 2008 19:07
 

Upcoming Events

No current events.

PAHO/WHO campaign against tobacco

This website is certified by Health
On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.

5400 Suncrest Dr., Suite C-4, El Paso, Texas 79912, United States of America
Tel.: (915) 845-5950 Fax: (915) 845-4361  www.fep.paho.org/  email email@fep.paho.org