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report cover imageThis comprehensive 200-page Regional report contains the 2005 data on antimicrobial resistance presented by the countries at the annual meeting in 2006 in Montevideo. There were three main themes: (a) surveillance; (b) quality management of laboratories and their importance in infectious disease control; and (c) review of epidemiological information.

Also covered were the progress made with the WHONET software, the role of the CLSI standards; the European standards for susceptibility tests; accreditation processes to ensure that quality standards are met; and an example on the introduction of quality assurance in Pharmacy and Biochemistry curricula.

Executive Summary | icon Full text in Spanish

The Annual Meeting of the Surveillance Network for Resistance to Antibiotics was held in Montevideo, Uruguay, from 14 to 16 November 2006, inaugurated by the local authorities. The working sessions were divided into three areas keys:

  • surveillance;
  • quality management of laboratories and their importance in infectious disease control; and
  • review of epidemiological information.

In the first working session; Dr. Manuel Guzmán Blanco of Venezuela showed the importance of resistance surveillance carried out in the country over the past five years, underlining the uses and abuses of antibiotics. Subsequently, he described patterns off resistance and multiple resistance that should be reported by sentinel centers to the national centers and that should be included in the annual report, as well as samples of results obtained should be sent to the national centers. Given the importance of laboratories’ role in the detection of beta-lactamases, there was an analysis of the consequences of this in the results obtained from the antibiograms if appropriate detection measures are not taken.

Moreover, there was a presentation of the progress made in the use of the WHONET software, its new options, and how to obtain more explicit results. A research protocol was also presented on Escherichia coli surveillance at the grassroots level, the results of sensitivity test surveys carried out by the Pan American Association of Infectious Diseases, and a brief description of outbreaks that occurred and/or specific surveillances measures taken in three countries of the Region.

 

Nicaragua presented its monitoring of enterohemorrhagic E. coli, which started with technical cooperation among countries with Argentina, to strengthen its detection techniques. The Chilean representative from the Institute of Public Health showed their country studies on investigating infection outbreaks within hospitals through molecular biology studies, which allows for detecting resistance in strains, even directly in clinical samples, as well as the presence of the gene v/s expression. The representative from Mexico presented the epidemiological situation of Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio parahaemolyticus in his country and detailed the plans for monitoring and ID testing carried out to identify choleraic toxin in strains of Vibrio cholerae O1 and Vibrio cholerae O:139.

During the session on quality management, there was a discussion on the progress and results of performance external evaluations, presented by the National Microbiology Laboratory of Canada and the Dr. Carlos G. Malbrán Institute of Buenos Aires. In this session there was a presentation of findings from a study conducted on the effect of the pH and the thickness of the Mueller Hinton in the antibiogram. In order to illustrate the subject with national experiences, there were presentations on the situation of quality assurance in sentinel laboratories of Bolivia, Uruguay, Brazil, and Guatemala, along with a presentation on the contribution of microbiology laboratories to the rational use of antibiotics in patients with hospital infections.

The following subjects were also covered: the role of CLSI standards; European standards for susceptibility testing; accreditation processes to ensure that quality standards are met; and an example on introducing quality assurance into Pharmacy and Biochemistry curricula at a Paraguayan university.

The last day was devoted to group data analysis and to reviewing past recommendations and compliance with them, as well as preparing new recommendations.

Last Updated on Wednesday, 23 March 2011 11:37

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