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file icon El Turismo de Salud en America Latina y el Caribe de Habla Inglesahot!Tooltip 12/13/2010 Hits: 1063

Al analizar la temática del turismo de salud en América Latina y el Caribe de habla inglesa, es importante reconocer que no se trata de un fenómeno reciente, sino que de una manera u otra, los servicios de salud han sido siempre objeto de intercambio internacional. En la actualidad, sin embargo, una serie de factores han llevado a su intensificación. Entre ellos es posible mencionar los siguientes

file icon Health and Tourism PAHO Concept Paperhot!Tooltip 12/13/2010 Hits: 832

This paper explores the issue of tourism, health and environment as a subject that connects the largest sector in the global economy with the issues of health/social capital, and environmental conservation. The economic importance and trends in tourism are summarized; health, safety and environment (HSE) issues as related to the industry such as food safety, Legionnaires’ disease, the threat of avian flu, and environmental degradation are described; and the scope for health-medical tourism explored. Potential solutions to problems and challenges are considered, such as the standards-based Quality Tourism for the Caribbean (QTC) initiative, and key policy issues considered that arise from the above such as HSE standards, certification, access to health services, training, and information and response systems, and the need for inter-sectoral approaches and publicprivate and international partnerships to move forward in this area. This paper has the precept that profitable, sustainable tourism requires a balance between financial/economic interests, human health interests and environmental interests. Without a doubt, the three-way intersect of tourism as the major economic activity for many countries and regions, combined with health and disease issues for tourists and local populations, and environmental conservation/degradation issues, constitute an area that is in need of attention and partnership to secure more profitable and sustainable tourism.

file icon Country/Economy Profiles and Data Representationhot!Tooltip 12/13/2010 Hits: 340

Travel & Tourism indicators

The second section presents Travel & Tourism (T&T) indicators that aim to provide a measure of the past, current, and projected future activity of Travel &Tourism in each an economy.This section is split into two parts

file icon The Travel and Tourism Competitiveness Reporthot!Tooltip 12/13/2010 Hits: 304

Since 1979, the World Economic Forum has been at the forefront of national competitiveness research. Our competitiveness work is aimed at contributing to a better understanding of why some countries grow prosperous, while others are left behind. Given the Forum’s longstanding interest in economic development, coupled with the growing importance of Travel & Tourism (T&T) for national economies, a study focusing on the T&T industry is extremely relevant. In this context, The Travel & Tourism Competitiveness Report aims to explore the factors and policies driving travel and tourism competitiveness in nations worldwide.

file icon Selected Issues of T&T Competitivenesshot!Tooltip 12/13/2010 Hits: 279

Travel & Tourism (T&T) is a critical source of economic growth and development in many countries around the world, rendering the measurement of its competitiveness an important undertaking. Over the past several decades, Travel & Tourism has become a key sector in the world economy. In 1950, international tourism receipts totaled a mere US$2.1 billion; by 2004 this had grown to an impressive US$622.7 billion.1 Tourism has become an extremely important employment and revenue generator internationally, providing jobs directly through the tourism industry itself (for example, hotels, visitor attractions, restaurants, tourist transport, and so on) and indirectly through the supply of many goods and services that are inputs to the tourism industry.2 In addition, there are many local revenue-generating activities that are not formally registered in the national accounts (for example, informal employment such as street vendors and informal guides).This indirect tourism revenue has been estimated to have a magnitude equal to that of direct tourism expenditures