6188 WHO WNTD19 Banner 1366x768px meo20190415 ENG The focus of World No Tobacco Day 2019 is on "tobacco and lung health."

Every year, on 31 May, the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) joins the global community to celebrate World No Tobacco Day. The annual campaign is an opportunity to raise awareness on the harmful and deadly effects of tobacco use and second -hand smoke exposure, and discourage the use of tobacco in any form.



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Tobacco and cardiovascular disease

Date: 31 May 2018

World No Tobacco Day 2018 will focus on the impact tobacco has on the cardiovascular health of people worldwide.

Tobacco use is an important risk factor for the development of coronary heart disease, stroke and peripheral vascular disease.

Despite the devastating harms of tobacco to heart health, and the availability of solutions to reduce tobacco-related death and disease, knowledge among large sections of the public that tobacco is one of the leading causes of CVD is low.

The campaign will increase awareness on the:

  • link between tobacco and heart and other cardiovascular diseases (CVD), including stroke, which combined are the world's leading causes of death;
  • feasible actions and measures that key audiences, including governments and the public, can take to reduce the risks to heart health posed by tobacco.

Goals of the World No Tobacco Day 2018 campaign

World No Tobacco Day 2018 aims to:

- Highlight the links between the use of tobacco products and heart and other cardiovascular diseases.

- Increase awareness within the broader public of the impact tobacco use and exposure to second-hand smoke have on cardiovascular health.

- Provide opportunities for the public, governments and others to make commitments to promote heart health by protecting people from use of tobacco products.

- Encourage countries to strengthen implementation of the proven MPOWER tobacco control measures contained in the WHO FCTC.

World No Tobacco Awards

President of Uruguay to receive WHO Director-General's Special Recognition Award for World No Tobacco Day

As well as the Special Recognition Award to Dr. Tabaré Vazquez, five other organizations and individuals from the Americas will also be recognized for their outstanding contributions to the fight against tobacco use in the region. These are: The Institute for Clinical Effectiveness and Health Policy (IECS), Argentina; Dr. Guillermo Paraje, Chile; The Ministry of Public Health, Guyana; Dr. Beatriz Champagne, United States; and Dr. Eduardo Bianco, Uruguay.

More information

PAHO ACTIVITIES

Video

"A conversation about Tobacco and Heart Disease"

Friday, 8 June 2018 - 11:00 am EDT

Connect via Webex to participate in a conversation on the effects of tobacco use in cardiovascular health. Click on the image or here for more information

evento WNTD2018 web

FacebookLIVE, "Tobacco breaks hearts"

Wednesday, 23 May 2018 - 10 am EDT

Join PAHO-WHO Facebook page the chat with PAHO advisors about how tobacco use harms your heart.

Click here or in the image to see the recording (in Spanish)

fb live WNTD2018 web

Facts about tobacco, heart and other cardiovascular diseases

Facts about tobacco, heart and other cardiovascular diseases

Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) kill more people than any other cause of death worldwide, and tobacco use and second-hand smoke exposure contribute to approximately 12% of all heart disease deaths. Tobacco use is the second leading cause of CVD, after high blood pressure.

The global tobacco epidemic kills more than 7 million people each year, of which close to 900 000 are non-smokers dying from breathing second-hand smoke. Nearly 80% of the more than 1 billion smokers worldwide live in low- and middle-income countries, where the burden of tobacco-related illness and death is heaviest.

The WHO MPOWER measures are in line with the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (WHO FCTC) and can be used by governments to reduce tobacco use and protect people from NCDs. These measures include:

- Monitor tobacco use and prevention policies;

- Protect people from exposure to tobacco smoke by creating completely smoke-free indoor public places, workplaces and public transport;

- Offer help to quit tobacco (cost-covered, population-wide support, including brief advice by health care providers and national toll-free quit lines);

- Warn about the dangers of tobacco by implementing plain/standardized packaging, and/or large graphic health warnings on all tobacco packages, and implementing effective anti-tobacco mass media campaigns that inform the public about the harms tobacco use and second-hand smoke exposure.

- Enforce comprehensive bans on tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship; and

- Raise taxes on tobacco products and make them less affordable.


Every year, on 31 May, PAHO joins WHO and partners mark World No Tobacco Day (WNTD), highlighting the health and additional risks associated with tobacco use, and advocating for effective policies to reduce tobacco consumption.


This year outstanding contributions to tobacco control as a crucial measure to Rolling back noncommunicable diseases to achieve Sustainable Development Goal 3 (Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages) will be highlighted.

The World Health Organization (WHO) is calling for nominations for the World No Tobacco Day Awards of individuals or organizations in the Region of the Americas for their accomplishments in the area of tobacco control.  The closing date for submissions is Thursday, 30 March 2017.


poster-wntd-2016Every year, on 31 May, WHO and partners mark World No Tobacco Day (WNTD), highlighting the health risks associated with tobacco use and advocating for effective policies to reduce tobacco consumption.

For World No Tobacco Day, 31 May 2016, WHO and the Secretariat of the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control are calling countries to get ready for plain (standardized) packaging of tobacco products.

Plain packaging is an important demand reduction measure that reduces the attractiveness of tobacco products, restricts use of tobacco packaging as a form of tobacco advertising and promotion, limits misleading packaging and labelling, and increases the effectiveness of health warnings.


Posters World no Tobacco Day 2015

One in every 10 cigarettes, and many other tobacco products, consumed worldwide are illegal, making the illicit trade of tobacco products a major global concern from many perspectives, including health, legal, economic, governance and corruption. The tobacco industry and criminal groups are among those who profit from the illegal tobacco trade, leaving the public to pay the health and security costs.


Every year, on 31 May, WHO and partners mark World No Tobacco Day, highlighting the health risks associated with tobacco use and advocating for effective policies to reduce tobacco consumption. Tobacco kills nearly 6 million people each year, of which more than 600 000 are non-smokers dying from breathing second-hand smoke. For World No Tobacco Day 2014, we are calling on countries to raise taxes on tobacco.


As part of the World No Tobacco Day 2013 activities, the Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization (PAHO/WHO) launched a campaign against advertising, promotion, and sponsorship of tobacco that features the Uruguayan soccer player Diego Forlán.



Every year, on 31 May, WHO and partners everywhere mark World No Tobacco Day, highlighting the health risks associated with tobacco use and advocating for effective policies to reduce tobacco consumption. Tobacco use is the single most preventable cause of death globally and is currently responsible for killing one in 10 adults worldwide.

The theme for World No Tobacco Day 2013 is: ban tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship.

A comprehensive ban of all tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship is required under the WHO Framework Convention for Tobacco Control (WHO FCTC) for all Parties to this treaty within five years of the entry into force of the Convention for that Party. Evidence shows that comprehensive advertising bans lead to reductions in the numbers of people starting and continuing smoking. Statistics show that banning tobacco advertising and sponsorship is one of the most cost-effective ways to reduce tobacco demand and thus a tobacco control "best buy".

Most countries lack comprehensive bans

Despite the effectiveness of comprehensive bans, only 6% of the world's population was fully protected from exposure to the tobacco industry advertising, promotion and sponsorship tactics in 2010 (WHO report on the global tobacco epidemic, 2011).
To help reduce tobacco use, comprehensive advertising, promotion and sponsorship bans work to counteract:

  • the deceptive and misleading nature of tobacco marketing campaigns;
  • the unavoidable exposure of youth to tobacco marketing;
  • the failure of the tobacco industry to effectively self-regulate; and
  • the ineffectiveness of partial bans.

Meanwhile, as more and more countries move to fully meet their obligations under the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (WHO FCTC), tobacco industry attempts to undermine the treaty become ever more aggressive, including those to weaken public health efforts to ban tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship. For example, where jurisdictions have banned advertising of tobacco products through point-of-sale displays — known as tobacco "powerwalls" — or banned the advertising and promotional features of tobacco packaging through standardized packaging, the tobacco industry has sued governments in national courts and through international trade mechanisms. On the other hand the tobacco industry uses sponsorship and especially corporate social responsibility tactics to trick public opinion into believing in their respectability and good intentions while they manoeuver to hijack the political and legislative process.

Goals

The global tobacco epidemic kills nearly 6 million people each year, of which more than 600 000 are non-smokers dying from breathing second-hand smoke. Unless we act, the epidemic will kill more than 8 million people every year by 2030. More than 80% of these preventable deaths will be among people living in low- and middle-income countries.

The ultimate goal of World No Tobacco Day is to contribute to protect present and future generations not only from these devastating health consequences, but also against the social, environmental and economic scourges of tobacco use and exposure to tobacco smoke.
Specific objectives of the 2013 campaign are to:

  • spur countries to implement WHO FCTC Article 13 and its Guidelines to comprehensively ban tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship such that fewer people start and continue to use tobacco; and
  • drive local, national and international efforts to counteract tobacco industry efforts to undermine tobacco control, specifically industry efforts to stall or stop comprehensive bans on tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship.

In the media:


Video: Ban tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship

Videos in: French | Spanish


Communication Material

World No Tobacco Day 2013 - Poster 1


World No Tobacco Day 2013 - Poster 2


Follow us in Facebook and Twitter Hashtags:  #AméricaLibredeTabaco   #TobaccoFreeAmericas   #ALT #TFA #TabacoyMentiras  #TobaccoandLies


All the tobacco industry's tactics and interference with public policy-making are aimed at increasing tobacco consumption and are detrimental to public health. The WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (WHO FCTC) and its Parties acknowledge that the tobacco industry represents a serious threat to the achievement of the Convention's goals and objectives. Article 5.3 of the WHO FCTC calls on Parties to protect public health policies from the commercial and other vested interests of the tobacco industry. All governmental sectors - including direct administration, with the executive, legislative and judicial branches, as well as indirect and autonomous administration - are bound to comply with Article 5.3.

Through the Final Political Declaration of the UN High-level Meeting on Prevention and Control of Noncommunicable Diseases the global leaders recognized in 2011 the fundamental and irreconcilable conflict between the tobacco industry's interests and public health policy interests, similar to the Guidelines for the implementation of WHO FCTC Article 5.3 adopted by the WHO FCTC Conference of Parties in 2009. This technical resource presents information to support the implementation of the Article 5.3 Guidelines by sharing practical action steps and best practices and examples applicable to the implementation of Article 5.3. This technical resource should be used in association with the text of the WHO Framework Convention and with its Article 5.3 Guidelines.

 

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